Sharing is Caring

28 Aug

When I look around my yard and garden at my house, I’ve noticed a trend. Most of what I have planted was given to me.

Here’s the iris my mom gave me about four or five years ago.

Sharing is Caring | The Farm PaparazziThe tulip and daffodil bulbs given as a shower gift by my Aunt Patty.

Sharing is Caring | The Farm Paparazzi

Sharing is Caring | The Farm PaparazziThere’s the strawberries and raspberries kindly shared by a church friend this spring.

Sharing is Caring | The Farm Paparazzi

Sharing is Caring | The Farm PaparazziRight next to it, my friend, Bonnie, gave me some rhubarb to transplant earlier this year.

Sharing is Caring | The Farm PaparazziShe also gave me the seeds that grew into these beautiful hollyhocks in the back yard.

Sharing is Caring | The Farm PaparazziWhat an example all these women have set; to give generously from what God has provided. I pray all these beautiful plants will serve as a reminder to share with others in return.

Sharing is Caring | The Farm PaparazziGod Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

You must each decide in your heart how much to give. And don’t give reluctantly or in response to pressure. “For God loves a person who gives cheerfully.” And God will generously provide all you need. Then you will always have everything you need and plenty left over to share with others. – 2 Corinthians 9:7-8

The Farmer’s Wife Wedding Quilt

23 Aug

When I was a bright-eyed newlywed, my good friend, Judy, asked me if she could make me a wedding quilt. In a moment of insanity, I said, “Actually…could we make one together? That way I could learn along the way!”

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziWell 3 years and, almost exactly, 3 months after I said “I do”, I finally finished said wedding quilt.

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziThe journey has been so fun. Judy was so patient with me (especially after a year in there were I didn’t accomplish anything on the quilt) and really helped me get excited about being a quilter. I can’t thank her enough for her kindness in teaching me and dedicating so much time and so many resources.

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziWe got the project up and running after Judy handed me a copy of The Farmer’s Wife Sampler Quilt. The book description says:

“The 1922 The Farmer’s Wife magazine posed this question to their readers: “If you had a daughter of marriageable age, would you, in light of your own experience, have her marry a farmer?” The magazine at the time had 750,000 subscribers, and received over 7,000 letters. The best answers to this question are included in this book, along with the traditional quilt blocks they inspired.”

How fitting for a girl who’d just married a farmer!

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm Paparazzi The entire sampler quilt has 111 unique blocks, so we decided to scale it down. Instead, I found another quilt pattern I liked, chose 23 blocks out of the book and Judy created a design from which to work.

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziBecause we wanted to include family in the process, I sent a letter to many of my and Tyler’s female relatives and asked for donations of fabric from their “stashes”. I received fabric from many generous family members. My maternal Gramma Marcie also gifted me with most of her huge fabric stash.

Then my mom gifted me my paternal grandmother’s sewing machine. Although she died when I was a baby, having Grandma Rozella’s machine made it feel like she was cheering me on as I sewed my wedding quilt.

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziJudy and I spent a lot of time selecting the right color values for each block. She also washed and ironed all the fabric (no small task). My first piecing experience was at the 2011 Wheatwater Quilters Retreat that the Platte County Parks and Recreation Department hosts each year. Judy started me off sewing all the little tan pieces. I even tried my hand at a couple blocks during that retreat.

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm Paparazzi

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm Paparazzi

Over the next couple of years, Judy and I worked on the tan blocks, the sampler quilt blocks and the piano keys (the striped borders). Finally at the 2013 Wheatwater retreat, we finished the blocks, added the brown borders and the piano keys and figured out what order we wanted to display the blocks.

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziA couple weeks later, we got together to finish the quilt top. It was so exciting to see all the intricate details start to form a REAL LIVE QUILT!

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziAfter the top was finished, Judy quilted it on her longarm machine.

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziOnce that was done, she showed me how to square up the quilt and how to sew on the binding. I took the project home, finished the binding and then proceeded to jump up and down and squeal!

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziIt was finally done! The girl who couldn’t sew a straight line in Jr. High Home Ec. just finished a whole quilt!

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm Paparazzi

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm Paparazzi

The Farmer's Wife Wedding Quilt | The Farm PaparazziWe still have to put the label on, but as of April 2014, the Farmer’s Wife Wedding Quilt is done!

God Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

Commit to the Lord whatever you do, and he will establish your plans. – Proverbs 16:3

Freezing Green Beans

18 Aug

Last year, before trying my own hand at gardening, my friend Melinda shared loads of veggies and herbs out of her beautiful garden.

IMG_0509

Freezing Corn IX | The Farm Paparazzi

Freezing Green Beans XIVShe shared lots of delicious, fresh green beans. We ate many of them fresh, but I also froze some of them. This year, my garden is exploding with green beans so I’m freezing some again. It’s an easy process and there’s a great set of instructions here.

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm PaparazziHere’s how I do it…First, start a pot of water to boil on the stove. Put the lid on the pot so it gets hot faster. While the water gets to boiling, sort through the beans and toss any that didn’t look so great.

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm PaparazziThen trim off the ends. You can cut them with a knife or snap them off with your fingers.

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm PaparazziFill a large bowl with ice water.

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm PaparazziLower the beans into the boiling water in batches.

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm Paparazzi

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm PaparazziCook them for a few minutes, until they turn a beautiful bright green. Then throw them into the ice water.

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm PaparazziThis process is called “blanching”. You dunk the beans in hot water for a few minutes to kill any bacteria and soften them slightly, then the ice water is used to “shock” them to stop the cooking process.

After they’ve cooled, fish them out of the ice water and drain them. I also pat them dry with paper towels.

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm PaparazziOnce all your beans are blanched, cooled and drained, it’s time to store them. You can put them in freezer bags, removing as much air as possible, and freeze. I have a food saver, so I use that.

Freezing Green Beans XII

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm Paparazzi

Freezing Green Beans | The Farm PaparazziVoila! Delicious garden green beans. These serve as a reminder during those long, Wyoming, winter months that summer will eventually come around again. Even if it seems so, so far away.

Freezing Green Beans XVGod Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

That evening the disciples came to him and said, “This is a remote place, and it’s already getting late. Send the crowds away so they can go to the villages and buy food for themselves.”

But Jesus said, “That isn’t necessary—you feed them.”

“But we have only five loaves of bread and two fish!” they answered.

“Bring them here,” he said. Then he told the people to sit down on the grass. Jesus took the five loaves and two fish, looked up toward heaven, and blessed them. Then, breaking the loaves into pieces, he gave the bread to the disciples, who distributed it to the people. They all ate as much as they wanted, and afterward, the disciples picked up twelve baskets of leftovers. About 5,000 men were fed that day, in addition to all the women and children! – Matthew 14:15-21 (NLT)

Crop Progress Aug. 2014

12 Aug

We’ve only got 25 acres left in malt barley harvest. It’s always gratifying to have most of the crop out of the field.Crop Progress Aug. 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Crop Progress Aug. 2014 | The Farm PaparazziThe beans are blooming and vining. If Mother Nature treats them well, they’ll be pinto beans on your plate this winter.

Crop Progress Aug. 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Crop Progress Aug. 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

The corn is all tasseled and the silks are being pollinated. Did you know that each strand of silk equals one corn kernel? Learn more about this on Dairy Carrie’s blog.

Crop Progress Aug. 2014 | The Farm PaparazziThe boys are still running around like crazy keeping water running. We live in an arid part of the country, so in order to get row crops to grow, we have to use irrigation. Other parts of the state and country rely on precipitation to grow their crops. This is called “dryland”. The Wheatland Irrigation District is actually one of the largest, privately-owned irrigation districts in the world!

Crop Progress Aug. 2014 | The Farm PaparazziWe’ve had some wet weather recently. What a change this year was from last year. In 2013 we didn’t have enough water for our crops. This year, we have more than enough. In fact, a 4-inch gulley-washer caused the irrigation district to temporarily turn off most of the water a couple weeks ago.

Crop Progress Aug. 2014 | The Farm PaparazziThat’s the life of a farmer; always dependent on the weather.

Crop Progress Aug. 2014 | The Farm PaparazziBut, boy, it’s a great life!

God Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

Keep your lives free from the love of money and be content with what you have, because God has said, “Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.” Hebrews 13:5 (NIV)

Cinnamon Rolls

9 Aug

Oh my, the first time I made these Cinnamon Rolls, I died and went to Heaven. My coworker and good friend, Kosha, and I made a load of them to take to meetings we were hosting around the state. They went perfectly with the Chugwater Chili we made.

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm PaparazziThe recipe is copied from The Pioneer Woman – Ree Drummond. While I used leftover dough from the Cabbage Burgers, everything else is pretty much the same as PWs recipe. I probably didn’t use as much butter, but who really uses as much butter as Ree? Ok, well, I probably do.

I won’t go into great detail because you should probably go to PWs website, since it IS her recipe. But, here’s basically what I did…

PWs Cinnamon Rolls

Tools:

Rolling pin

Serrated knife and cutting board

Baking dishes (rectangle or round)

Mixing bowl, liquid measuring cup, measuring spoons

Roll Ingredients:

Leftover roll dough from making Cabbage Burgers

1 stick of butter, softened (I mean really soft)

Cinnamon

Sugar

Melted butter (about 4-5 T)

Frosting Ingredients:

1 bag Powdered sugar

1/2 C whole milk

1/2 stick butter, melted

1/2 C Orange juice

1 T maple flavoring

If you’re making these directly after the Cabbage Burgers, like I did, then wipe away the old dusting of flour with a dry cloth. Re-dust the countertop with flour. Roll out all the remaining dough with a rolling pin.

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm PaparazziTake the stick of softened butter and spread across the entire surface of the dough. PW tells you to melt the butter, but I like this method better so it doesn’t seep out the ends as much when you roll it up.

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm PaparazziSprinkle liberally with sugar (about a cup).

IMG_1390Then sprinkle liberally with cinnamon. You could probably use more than I did. My dusting was a little light.

IMG_1392Tightly roll up the dough.

IMG_1394When you get to the other side, pull the dough up to the top of the roll and pinch it into place.

IMG_1395

IMG_1400Put the log onto a cutting board. Don’t be like me, who cut directly on the counter. Take a sharp, serrated knife and cut into 1 inch sections.

IMG_1402Cover the bottom of each baking dish with a little melted butter and place the cinnamon rolls in the dish. Don’t overcrowd.

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm PaparazziCover with a dish cloth and let rise for 20-30 minutes.

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm Paparazzi

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm PaparazziBake at 375F for 15-17 minutes. Just until they start to get slightly brown on top. You don’t want to overcook them.

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm Paparazzi

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm PaparazziWhile they’re baking, mix up the frosting ingredients. Be sure to slowly add the orange juice to get the consistency you want. It should be pourable, but not too thin. PW uses coffee instead of OJ, but I didn’t have any brewed up.

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm PaparazziPour the frosting over the rolls directly after removing them from the oven.

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm PaparazziI immediately ate the two goofy looking ones near the top of the right pan. It just didn’t seem right to leave them there.

Now, go share with your friends so your hips don’t get too big!

God Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him. – Colossians 3:17 (NIV)

Cabbage Burgers

9 Aug

I wish you could’ve smelled my house yesterday. It smelled heavenly from my baking frenzy of cabbage burgers and cinnamon rolls. The mixture of fresh-baked bread, savory meat/cabbage mixture and sweet sugar ‘n cinnamon would make anyone drool.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cinnamon Rolls | The Farm PaparazziLet me preface this recipe by saying, I’m sorry to my fellow OCD sisters and brothers out there. These instructions will include a lot of “just eyeball it” instructions. It’s taken me many batches of cabbage burgers to get a “feel” for how I like them. I’ll do my best to share tips and suggestions. Don’t be scared! It’s totally worth it in the end. You and I will get through this together.

Okay, now that’s out of the way, we can get down to the business of creating awesomeness.

Cabbage Burgers

The Lauck Family Recipe

Tools:

Large knife and cutting board

Large bowls

Large frying pan

Wooden spoon and slotted spoon

Colander

Rolling pin

Baking sheets

Pastry brush

Ingredients:

2 lb ground beef

1-2 T Canadian steak seasoning

1 medium white or yellow onion, diced

1 medium to large head of green cabbage, shredded (see above)

Premade dough recipe

All purpose flour

1/2 stick butter, melted

To get started, I harvested two heads of cabbage from the garden and made a double batch of the Easiest Roll Dough the day before I made these.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziTo make the cabbage burgers (cabbage rolls, krautburgers…whatever your family calls ‘em), you begin by shredding the cabbage. Never done that before? Here’s a great video tutorial:

For cabbage burgers, I do the slice method mentioned in the video. Make sure to use a good, sharp knife.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziI also am slightly picky about the texture of the cabbage I use, so I also tear out any big, hard veins I find. These cabbages were pretty large, so after I cut off the core, I also took out the centers, which was a lot of the thick, veiny stuff anyway.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziWith cabbage all ready to go, it’s time to brown the ground beef in a large skillet over medium high.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziAdd the onion when the ground beef is mostly browned, but still slightly pink. That way the onions won’t get overcooked.Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziWhen the ground beef is completely browned (no pink), turn off the heat and drain any excess fat. I put a small glass dish over my sink drain and place my colander on top of it to catch the fat. That way it won’t go down the drain and clog things up.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziPour the ground beef back in the skillet and season with Canadian steak seasoning or your choice of preferred seasoning. DON’T turn the heat back on. Add the cabbage to the skillet (or if there’s not enough room, mix together in a large mixing bowl). It will look like a LOT of cabbage, but don’t be alarmed. It will wilt down. Plus, lots of cabbage means moist, delicious Cabbage Burgers.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi The heat from the beef mixture will be enough to wilt down the cabbage. Let it cool in the skillet or transfer to a large bowl to cool. You might want to stick it in the fridge to be safe. Sometimes I do that and finish making the cabbage burgers the next day.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziOnce the cabbage/meat mixture is completely cooled, pull out your roll dough. If you used my recipe, it’ll look like this.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziUsing your hands, pull the dough away from the sides and form into a large ball. It will be just slightly sticky.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziSprinkle the counter with a light dusting of flour. Pinch off pieces of the dough and roll into a rough ball with your hands. Don’t overwork this dough. It gets tough pretty fast.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziRoll out the dough. Take one long stroke away from you, then one long stroke toward you. Rotate the dough and repeat, flipping over as needed, until it’s about a 1/4″ thick and about 7-8″ long and 6-7″ wide. This makes a fairly large roll.

IMG_1360

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziUsing a slotted spoon, carefully heap on top of your rolled-out dough. Don’t be stingy!

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziGently, pull up the long sides of your dough and pinch and twist together. Do this all the way down one end, then work down the other side.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziThe ends will probably have some excess dough. I tear it off and pinch up the ends to close. I’ve tried re-using the ends and it gets too tough to work with, so I usually toss them when I’m done.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziOnce the dough is closed around the filling, I use the sides of my hands to gently shape into a round form.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziThen I place the cabbage burger seam-side down on a baking sheet lined with a baking mat or sprayed with cooking spray. Put 4-5 on a sheet, careful not to overcrowd. Then cover and let rest for 10-20 minutes to rise slightly. Used up all your filling and have dough leftover? Check out this quick Cinnamon Roll recipe!

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziBake at 350F until golden brown (about 30 minutes).

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziBrush with melted butter using a pastry brush.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm Paparazzi

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziYou can eat them now, or cool for later. To cool, set on wire racks. Once they are mostly cool, place in fridge, uncovered, to completely cool. This will prevent them from releasing steam in bags or containers and getting soggy.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziAfter they are fully cooled, I place them in gallon storage bags and store in the fridge for up to a week. The single recipe makes about eight Cabbage Burgers, depending on the size. I make them pretty big and doubled the recipe, so it produced 15 this time. I also had enough dough leftover to make a batch of Cinnamon Rolls.

Now, go do the dishes. Then come to my house and do mine. It’s only fair. I told you how to make the things.

Cabbage Burgers | The Farm PaparazziGod Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

Since God chose you to be the holy people He loves, you must clothe yourselves with tenderhearted mercy, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. – Colossians 3:12 (NLT)

The Easiest Roll Dough

8 Aug

We’ve got cabbage ready in the garden and all you German farmers out there know what that means…Krautburgers!

My Farmer Husband loves cabbage burgers. The first thing he said when I harvested a cabbage from our garden was, “Are you going to make cabbage burgers?”

Yes, dear. I will make them. But, first, I’ve got to prepare the dough.

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm PaparazziThis roll dough recipe is from my high school English/journalism teacher, who is also now my neighbor (I love small towns!). When we got married, she shared several easy recipes with me. Perfect for a new, busy wife!

Here ’tis…

Refrigerator Roll Dough

From the Kitchen of: Mrs. Pat Mitchell

Tools:

One medium and one small mixing bowl (*if you have the kind with lids, even better!)

Liquid measuring cups

Dry measuring cups and spoons

Whisk, wooden spoon, fork

*Large container or bowl with a lid (like a Tupperware or Rubbermaid)

 

Ingredients:

½ C sugar

1 T salt

2 T shortening

¾ C really hot water

1 C warm water (110-115˚F)

2 T active dry yeast

1 beaten egg

All purpose flour

In a medium bowl, combine the sugar and salt. Add the shortening and pour the hot water over the top to help melt the shortening. Whisk until combined.

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm Paparazzi

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm Paparazzi

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm PaparazziIn a small bowl, whisk together the warm water, yeast and egg. Make sure the water temperature is right or the yeast won’t activate properly.

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm Paparazzi

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm Paparazzi

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm Paparazzi

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm PaparazziAdd the yeast mixture to the sugar mixture.

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm PaparazziAdd flour to consistency. Mix with a wooden spoon. The dough should be soft and not sticky.

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm Paparazzi

IMG_9052

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm PaparazziI just put my lid on my mixing bowl, but if you don’t have those, put the dough in a container with a tight lid. Place in the refrigerator overnight. After it raises once (and will probably pop the top off), it’s ready.

The Easiest Roll Dough | The Farm PaparazziYou can cut off what you want for a meal and make into dinner rolls, buns, cinnamon rolls or cabbage burgers (recipe forthcoming)!

Leave the rest in the fridge for another time. Mrs. Mitchell says it’s good for up to two weeks.

God Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

Then [the older women] can urge the younger women to love their husbands and children, to be self-controlled and pure, to be busy at home, to be kind, and to be subject to their husbands, so that no one will malign the word of God. – Titus 2:4-5 (NIV)

How Does Your Garden Grow?

5 Aug

One year when my Aunt Patty was in 4-H, her gardening record book won a national award and she earned a trip to Chicago. Pretty good for a girl from little Chugwater (pop. approx. 250).

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm PaparazziThe way my mom tells the story, Patty’s winning secret was her sense of humor. When asked to describe how she planted her garden, she said she did so in alphabetical order. That way, the Weeds were last!

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm PaparazziThis year was my first year planting a vegetable garden. My college roommates will laugh when they see how good it looks! I had a definite black thumb back then. Couldn’t even keep a houseplant alive.

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm Paparazzi

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm PaparazziBut, marrying a farmer sure paid off, because look how my garden grows! It’s been a team effort between my Farmer Husband and I. It’s a true Farm Wife garden. The rows were bedded, strip tilled and are irrigated with gated pipe!

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm Paparazzi

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm PaparazziAfter a replant situation due to tiny, white worms eating most of the seed, we’ve had good weather and everything is growing great. Tyler tells me the secret is plenty of water, hoeing regularly to keep the weeds down (those suckers grow FAST), and applying fertilizer at the right time. It also helps when it doesn’t hail (fingers crossed!).

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm PaparazziAlready we’ve been eating spinach, lettuce, red beets, cabbage, green onions, snowpeas, a couple tomatoes, jalapenos, zucchini and yellow squash. It’s so fun to bring things directly from the garden into the kitchen to eat. The tomatoes, sweet peppers, green chilies and beans and cucumbers are *this close* to being ready. The sweet corn is tassled and silking and the pumpkins are filling up with lots of little guys.

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm Paparazzi

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm PaparazziDo you garden? What’s your secret to success? What’s your favorite thing to grow? I’d love to hear from you!

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm Paparazzi

How Does Your Garden Grow? | The Farm PaparazziGod Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

Now all glory to God, who is able, through his mighty power at work within us, to accomplish infinitely more than we might ask or think. – Ephesians 3:20

Malt Barley Harvest

3 Aug

Although some rain and break downs have caused interruptions, we are going in the barley fields. We raise malt barley for MillerCoors. It gets trucked to Berthoud, Colo. from our farm and then MillerCoors takes it to the brewery in Golden. This summer, we got to tour the brewery with some family members. I’ll tell you all about that trip sometime soon.

In the meantime, enjoy some snapshots from Barley Harvest 2014 on T&L Farms.

 

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Barley heads dried down and ready to combine. Our local John Deere salesman says they are bowing their heads to pray.

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Tyler runs the combine through the field and puts out his auger so the grain cart operator knows he’s ready to unload.

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

The combine separates the heads from the stalk and the berries from the head. The berries go fill up the tank on the top of the combine. The leftovers go out the back of the combine.

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

When the grain cart is full, the operator usually dumps on a truck at the end of the field. Then the truck either takes the grain straight to Coors, or to our bins for storage until later transport.

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Our bins are located in the corner of this barley field so the cart operator is taking the grain straight to the parked truck. Then the auger operator unloads the truck directly into the auger to go up into the bin.

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

We’re putting our straw in windrows so we can bale it. Sometimes we attach the spreaders on the back of the combine, which spreads the straw across the field to decay and turn into organic matter.

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

A hopper full of golden grain is always a beautiful site to a farmer at harvest time!

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Tyler almost always operates the combine.

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Here, our cousin and farm team member, Damon, is operating the grain cart.

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

And, sometimes, I get to run grain cart. It’s a fun job. I love being a Farm Wife!

If you’re harvesting, we pray the crop is plentiful and the problems are few!

God Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

Then the earth will yield its harvests, and God, our God, will richly bless us. – Psalm 67:6 (NLT)

Calm Before the (Harvest) Storm

30 Jul

We’re starting to get into malt barley harvest this week. Here are some pictures from late last week. This storm missed us, but yesterday we got pounded by 4″ of rain. Not ideal, but as farmers, we don’t get to choose the weather. Happy Harvesting!

Calm Before the Harvest Storm | The Farm Paparazzi  Calm Before the Harvest Storm | The Farm Paparazzi

Calm Before the Harvest Storm | The Farm PaparazziGod Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

For God is the one who provides seed for the farmer and then bread to eat. In the same way, he will provide and increase your resources and then produce a great harvest of generosity in you. – 2 Corinthians 9:10 (NLT)

Nagle Warren Mansion Bed & Breakfast

Enjoy the life of a cattle baron, at least for a few minutes...

Control Freaks

Wyoming Weed Science in (almost) Real Time

Chasing Birds

Just another WordPress.com site

Kate Meadows Writing and Editing

Bridging people through story and expression.

Rural Route 2

The Life & Times of an Illinois Farm Girl

Facts About Beef

Debunking myths about beef

Ladder Ranch

Scenes, thoughts and poetry from our working ranch

Armed with an automatic setting to expose a happy life full of God's grace

Armed with an automatic setting to expose a happy life full of God's grace

Agriculture Proud

Food and Farming with a young cattleman

Miss in the Kitchen

Quick and delicious family style recipes.

Armed with an automatic setting to expose a happy life full of God's grace

BigStar Photography

FRESH senior + children's photography in Springfield, MO + the surrounding Ozarks

Bridle-Bit Training and Tack Weblog

Realistic Horsemanship for Realistic Horsemen

Real Ranchers

a virtual visit to wyoming's rural communities

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 32 other followers

%d bloggers like this: