Tag Archives: malt barley

See the Grain Cart Work

25 Jul

It’s barley harvest time! During grain harvest, we have a lot of engines running. The combine does the harvesting job, the grain cart does the transporting job, and the trucks do the hauling job.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

In the past I’ve helped by running grain cart. If anyone had told me ten years ago that I’d learn how to run large farm equipment with confidence and success, I’d have laughed. But, that was a lesson in never saying never.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

The past couple years, motherhood has taken top priority so I haven’t been in the field other than to run out lunch and be a passenger in the combine. As my mentor, Melinda, says, I also help by keeping things running at home. My farmer needs and appreciates those clean clothes, a peaceful home, and good meals.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

We have good help during barley harvest. Our fantastic, hard-working employees Chris and Ken keep the trucks headed to the bin and the grain cart running. Tyler’s brother Cooper also works for us on the weekends when he’s not mechanicing for a local John Deere dealership.

In the past, Tyler’s long-time friend, Scott, also kept the grain cart going. I get questions from some of my friends about what the purpose of the grain cart is, so here Scott demonstrates.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

After the combine fills the grain cart with, well, grain; the operator heads to the end of the field where the truck is waiting.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

This is one of the only times when 10 mph feels fast.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

As the cart operator approaches the truck, he raises his auger.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

Wait for it.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

There it is.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

He pulls back his RPMs and turns on the auger.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

Then he opens up the auger’s gate, revs up the RPMs, and starts to fill.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

The spout is adjustable so the cart driver can better position the grain as he fills.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

He starts at the front of the truck (closer to the cab) and moves toward the back as the box gets full.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

Once the truck is full, he closes his gate, shuts the auger off, and pulls away. He makes certain to be clear of the truck and then puts his auger back down.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

Then the truck driver takes the load to our bins.

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

At the bins, the driver dumps the grain from the truck into the auger, which fills the grain bins.

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

And the cart heads back to the combine…

See the Grain Cart Work | The Farm Paparazzi

…where he waits to get filled up and do it all over again.

God Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

I pray that your love will overflow more and more, and that you will keep on growing in knowledge and understanding. – Philippians 1:9

Brewery Tour: Where Our Malt Barley Turns into Beer

22 Dec

 

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Malt barley harvest on T&L Farms

Last summer we arranged a tour of the MillerCoors brewery in Golden, Colo. As contracted malt barley growers, we got the special treatment.

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

Our tour group consisted of Tyler and I, my mom Amy, dad Steve, brother Ben, Tyler’s mom Kim, her husband Bill, and Tyler’s Great Uncle Harry, and Great Aunt Veletia. Veletia put together a detailed, very informative slideshow of the trip, the company’s history, and the brewing process here. It’s a fun read with great photos!

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

During Prohibition, the company diversified by making ceramics and other malted products.

We learned a lot about how beer is brewed in mass quantity. It was fun to see the final leg in our barley’s existence. Now I’ve seen it go from field to cup!

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Barley growing on T&L Farms

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

I’d never seen hops in person before. Have you? They had it growing outside the brewery, and had some of it to touch on the way into the facility.

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

We saw what the barley goes through before other ingredients are added.

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

Steeping tanks. The barley is soaked twice before it is germinated.

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

Germinated barley. This must be done before the grain is suitable for brewing.

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

Kilning or roasting is done to get the barley just right for different types of beer.

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

Kilning or roasting before the barley is sent to the brewing process.

This was the best smelling place. The barley goes through the brewing process where other ingredients are introduced. Veletia’s slideshow really has a great explanation of the details.

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

The finished beer goes through quality control. It’s all more scientific than I ever imagined beer brewing would entail.

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

We also got to see the product being packaged on site. Look at that sea of cans.

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

And, of course, we got to taste test some of the product. Was a fun time had by all!

MillerCoors Tour | The Farm Paparazzi

 

“Let a man walk ten miles steadily on a hot summer’s day along a dusty English road, and he will soon discover why beer was invented.” – Gilbert K Chesterton.

God Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

And let us not neglect our meeting together, as some people do, but encourage one another, especially now that the day of his return is drawing near. – Hebrews 10:25

 

Soaking up the Sun

18 Jul

After the long weeks of rain departed and the sun started shining, our crops and garden took off with a bang!

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

Clay is happy to be soaking up the sun. Our short-haired dog did not approve of the rain and clouds.

The corn is close to head high and some is starting to tassel.

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

Over knee high on June 25

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

Over chest high on July 10

The barley is getting close to harvest. It won’t be too long before you can drink it from a Coors can.

IMG_2499

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

The beans are really taking off.

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

The garden is growing like crazy. I’m picking zucchini and anxiously awaiting tomatoes and peppers.

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

Garden on July 2…

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

…and then on July 10!

The sweet corn is all tasseled. If all goes well, we’ll sell some at the Platte County Farmer’s Market this year.

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

Sweet corn on June 25

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

Sweet corn on July 13

Even my herb garden is providing abundant offerings.

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

A bouquet from my herb garden: mint, Shasta daises and lavender.

Tyler and our farm employee, Brian, have been chasing water like mad. Irrigation is a huge task in our arid climate.

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

They’ve been preparing pivots and cleaning out plugged nozzles, cleaning irrigation ditches, laying out gated pipe and plastic ditch and ditching rows and diking the ends of the flood fields to control the water and ensure it runs down the rows.

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

And that’s just to prepare for irrigating! Then they actually have to set flood water and manage pivots to irrigate the crops. It seems like this happens all at once. Two guys and 1400 acres makes for a lot of hard work and long days.

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

But Clay doesn’t mind. This is his favorite time of year.

Growing | The Farm Paparazzi

God Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

Yet we hear that some of you are living idle lives, refusing to work and meddling in other people’s business. We command such people and urge them in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ to settle down and work to earn their own living. As for the rest of you, dear brothers and sisters, never get tired of doing good. 2 Thessalonians 3:11-13 (NLT)

Whistle While You Till

20 Mar
Drilling 2015 | The Farm Paparazzi

Drilling malt barley seed

Happy First Day of Spring! It’s been beautiful here in Wheatland. Our trademark Rapid Air Movement (RAM, a.k.a. wind) has been kind to us, the temperatures have been favorable and we haven’t yet gotten dumped on by a major blizzard. I’m sure this also makes the ranchers happy as they calve this time of year.

Drilling 2015 | The Farm Paparazzi

Filling the grain drill with malt barley seed

We’ve been in full swing getting malt barley planted. It’s one of my favorite crops to watch grow and to harvest. Nothing like seeing beautiful fields of green and, later on, golden waves of grain!

Tillage 2015 | The Farm Paparazzi

Malt barley growing in June 2014

 

Malt Barley Harvest 2014 | The Farm Paparazzi

Malt barley harvest 2014. Combine harvests the grain (left) and the grain cart takes the grain to load on the trucks (right).

In order to prepare the seed bed for the malt barley, we’ve been busy tilling; discing, plowing and roller-harrowing. I’ve been able to help quite a bit in running all three implements. I also helped drill some of the barley. When I was a little girl, I didn’t imagine I’d be married to a farmer and running huge tractors in the fields!

Tillage 2015 | The Farm Paparazzi

Discing a field. The disc breaks up the top layer of soil and works organic material from last years’ crop into the soil.

 

Tillage 2015 | The Farm Paparazzi

Plowing. In certain circumstances (variables depend on soil type, the crop grown the year before, etc.) it is necessary to perform “heavy” tillage.

 

Tillage 2015 | The Farm Paparazzi

Roller harrowing. We call it a roller harrow, but many folks call it a mulcher. This breaks up the soil clods and creates a smooth, consistent seed bed for good seed to soil contact.

Agriculture is being celebrated across the country this week during National Agriculture Week. I see no better way to do that than to be farming!

Tillage 2015 | The Farm Paparazzi

Discing a field where we had harvested pinto beans last year. Discing prepared the seed bed for drilling malt barley. You could really see how it lightly tilled up the soil and distributed the bean residue.

 

Tillage 2015 | The Farm Paparazzi

Can’t you just smell the soil? A beautiful day for plowing!

Why should you care about agriculture? It permeates every part of your daily life! From the food you eat, to the clothes and cosmetics you wear, to the medicines you take and more! Learn more at www.agday.orgwww.fooddialogues.com and www.factsaboutbeef.com.

 

I’d love to hear what you’ve been up to and what your spring plans are!

God Bless You & American Agriculture,

Liz

He tends his flock like a shepherd: He gathers the lambs in his arms and carries them close to his heart; he gently leads those that have young. – Isaiah 40:11 (NIV)

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